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Effects of Cooking on Nutrient Absorption

When looking to increase nutrient/mineral intake…

(Jannes Jacobs)

It is important to know how much of that is retained throughout the digestive process – and how much is let pass through the system. It is normally understood that cooking foods denatures the live enzymes – causing nutrient/mineral loss.

…However, did you know that in some foods it actually increases certain minerals like calcium?

According to one study – cooking spinach actually increases the calcium content from 25mg/cup to 245mg/cup! This is an outstanding difference – now it is important to understand that the body absorbs only a percentage of that. The values differ for each mineral – where calcium is about 35% whereas minerals like copper, zinc and selenium (used for various organ functions) ranges from 30%-80% absorption.

Going even further – there are now brands that sell fermented vitamins that promise up to 70% absorption of each supplement. These strategies can be combined with taking live enzymes found in raw apple cider vinegar, probiotics, and yogurt to maximize this absorption and uptake. And from a personal perspective – it is important to choose foods which will sit with you for longer periods of time. These foods include many raw fruits and vegetables – that take longer to break down, and when combined with stretches and meditation – can significantly improve the uptake of benefits.

Foods from quick restaurants like Taco Bell and Mcdonalds will actually pass through the system at a quick rate – where very little is actually held onto and taken into the system as useful long-term energy. That is something to think about after your meal – how does it make you feel? Do you feel calm and grounded, coming from a more alkaline-based food habit – or do you feel stressed with heartburn? If so, monitor these things in your mind, and read my next blog about the importance of maintaining a balanced pH.

Your Health and Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR)

Your resting metabolic rate is the total number of calories your body burns when it is completely at rest. Basically, your resting metabolic rate (RMR) is the number of calories you would burn if you decided to stay in bed all day and do nothing else!

The Resting Metabolic Rate supports breathing, blood circulation, organ function, and other basic body functions. No matter if you want to lose, gain or maintain weight, knowing your resting metabolic rate is important for any health connoisseur. Your resting metabolic rate is the number of calories your body needs each day to function properly. Knowing your resting metabolic rate can help you gain, lose or maintain weight. Therefore, knowing your resting metabolic rate is an important step in realizing your health and fitness goals.

The basics: What is a Resting Metabolic Rate?

(Pickled Stardust)

Your resting metabolic rate is the total number of calories per day your body burns when it is completely at rest. That means without any exercise or any other daily activities like walking the dog.

Your resting metabolic rate (RMR) includes the calories needed to support basic bodily functions, including such activities of breathing, blood circulation, organ function, and other basic neurological activities. Once you understand your RMR, you will understand how many calories your body needs each day to function properly.

 

Many factors can affect your RMR. These factors include body mass, body composition, age, gender, hormones, nutrition, stress, exercise and diet.

Your specific RMR, at this point in time, determines how many calories you’ll need each day in order to maintain your current weight. If you want to gain weight, you’ll need to consume more calories than your daily RMR. Likewise, if you want to lose weight, you’ll need to consume less calories than your daily RMR, or you’ll need to create a deficit of daily calories by burning off the remaining calories via exercise.